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Matemático japonés crea ilusiones ópticas insólitas

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Confidencial Colombia – En el sentido común popular siempre se cree que las leyes de la física ya están establecidas y verdaderamente queda muy poco por explorar. Kokichi Sugihara, matemático japonés pone a prueba dichas leyes con ilusiones ópticas creadas por él.

Sugihara, con doctorado en física de  la Universidad Meiji en Tokio, se ha hecho famoso por las insólitas ilusiones que crea en 3D. Acá la prueba de cómo el juega con la percepción visual de nuestro cerebro.

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Tree Tops: these conical wooden tops are more stable when spun on their stems than on their points. Spinning things behave differently! The mirror is slightly bowl shaped and keeps the top from walking off the table. ➡️ Follow the link in my profile for info on where to get this and many other amazing items featured here on @physicsfun #conical #spinningtop #toytop #physics #physicstoy #precession #inertia #rotationalinertia #angularmomentum #treetop #Areaware #science #scienceisawesome

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Wobblo: curious kinetic art toy- a hollow plastic torus contains a rolling heavy steel ball within. The motions of the center of mass of the ball and torus combine dynamically- the resulting curious motion is related to the interplay between the exchange of kinetic and potential energy and conservation of angular momentum of the system. The concave mirror keeps the toy from rolling out of frame for the video. A simple system that leads to interesting and complex motion. ➡ Follow the link in my profile for info on where to buy this toy and other amazing items featured here on @physicsfun #oscillations #angularmomentum #centerofmass #balance #equilibrium #physics #physicstoy #science #wobblo #kineticart #scienceisawesome

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Glow Tippe-Top: spinning things often have surprising physics. Glow-in-the-Dark version of the famous flip-over top makes the transition of the stem to the bottom easier to see. Friction with the countertop provides a torque that acts on the existing angular momentum of the top to flip it over. The top will stay flipped until the spin rate slows down enough to where its center of mass pulls it back to the resting position. ➡️ Follow the link in my profile for details on the physics of the tippe-top and where to get the amazing items featured here on @physicsfun #tippytop #tippetop #torque #angularmomentum #physics #physicstoy #flip #flipover #precession #spin #spinning #top #spinningtop #science #scienceisawesome

Una publicación compartida de physicsfun (@physicsfun) el

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